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CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 2:05pm EST
free speech, stewards of scholarship and education, disseminate ears of scientific discovery, and champions of literature. however one defines knowledge economy today it could not have emerged, is not worth sustaining without the production and distribution of books, journals and other professional content. it goes without saying that wherever there is publishing there's copyright. senator keating called copyright the jugular of the book publishing industry. when maria said that earlier this year, i thought i have got to use that, a tribute that to her. and i certainly would not do otherwise. but it seems to me to sum up very much what i have heard since i walked into this position three years ago. there are a lot of publishers who care a lot more about making books than they do about making money. but given the structure of the industry there has to be return. one of the big six did say to me i gamble with other people's money. that is particularly true of the trade sector, the consumer sector where every book is different and you don't know what is going to work and what is not
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 2:00pm EST
a controversial example to deal with education. many big school districts across the country are struggling with the problem of low achievement, low academic achievement and motivation especially among the kids that come from families and backgrounds where they were not encouraged from a young age to read and learn. the school districts some of them are experimenting with cash incentives to motivate academic achievement. paying their kids to get a good grade to score well on the standardized exams they tried this in new york city, washington, d.c. and chicago. in dallas they tried offering second graders to dollars for each book they read it's a promising idea that people are not very happy about it but let's have a discussion here and begin by taking a survey of opinion to the if you were the superintendent of one of these school districts and you were approached with this proposal, how many things it is a good idea worth trying and how many of you would object in principle? let's see first how many of you would object? how many of you would not like this idea? quite a few. and
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 1:00pm EST
wanted us to get educated. >> host: windier member been interested in public policy and there is a government? >> guest: when i started doing legal history at michigan and started leading all the legal history staff, did a dissertation about the draft that was enacted during the civil war, the first national draft act. from reading the documents i read, all the materials generated by government agencies and even legal history of the law at the very concerned about how power is exercised and whether there's a voice for people not in power. how did the powerless get somebody to listen to them which is what i love so much about the commission because i was insisting on listening to people. when you go to san antonio, texas and was the first hearing the commission had held on the tenets that i write about in the book. there'll these latinos who nobodies listen to them in case they were kicked out of school because they spoke spanish and was told was a dirty language. all these people, education was awful. we listen to them. when you go and read about the kind of book who was run over b
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 12:00pm EST
tinkering didn't have a college degree so often there's a sense of, well, we need stem education, and, absolutely, i think we do, but we shouldn't underestimate this sense of practical skill that are often passed down from generation, the people of fire who actually are doing things on the factory floor that account for a lot of globe's most successful innovation when it comes to fire suits. one of the pieces, as i said, is that our democratic culture in the business world gives us this competitive advantage of o more authoritarian manufacturing structure, particularly small and medium sized businesses because that allows them to economize production, and that allows them to customize products. the second thesis in the book is tracing a support of manufacturing back in american history, and the idea there's always been a role for government support of private industry. going all the way back to alexander hamilton. i tell people you don't have to read the "world the flat" to understand what we have to do in a global competitive world. read alexander ham hamilton's rt on manufacturing,
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 8:30pm EST
for an america of continental red, network transportation, widespread education and industrial might. at the same time these 12 terrible months revealed the dreadful cost of entry into that future. payable in blood and misery on battlefields from shiloh sharpsburg, do you bridge to fredericksburg. most of all though, 1862 was the year lincoln rose to greatness. never since the founding of the country has so much depended on the judgment, the cunning, the timing and the sheer physical endurance of one man. now how lincoln survived and ultimately triumphed through 1862 is a very good story but it takes a whole book to tell. tonight i would like to talk for a few minutes with you about why lincoln poured everything he had into the struggle. why was it so important to him to save the union? why fight a war that cost more american lives than all of our other wars put together? three-quarters of a million people dead and countless more wounded in body and in mind. to understand this story, i must take you back another 50 plus years before 1862, to a winter day in february, 18 nine. when ab
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 11:15am EST
that we are holding onto as we compete globally and how well we have done educating the people to take their place in the economy, and i would hope that whatever agenda comes forward we have an agenda that is deeply, deeply focused on adult learning, and of education, community colleges and finding more ways for people to constructively enter the economy. >> counselor? >> i would concur on those points. i'm grateful i live in a state that has a governor deval patrick and living in a country with president barack obama. one of the reasons you just stated in creating better access to both educational opportunities and health care which is eliminating all of those other disparities. it's important we not upset about the 99% of the 47% and just remember that there are people behind all of those percentages, and people that has been struggling and people living in poverty. if you talk about the shrinking middle class, who were the joining? and so i want a president and governor and a major that believes in making those critical investment in physical infrastructure and in people that s
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 3:00pm EST
the education of our children and the health of the market. .. [applause] our coverage of the international summit of the book continues now by a panel called the publishing world yesterday and today. it about one hour 20 minutes. >> good afternoon, ladies and supplement. it's a pleasure see so many of you, so many old friends here. i have a great privilege of being senior consultant for the librarian of congress, and i am also a writer and editor in chief and the world. and also a veteran of the publishing world. i have worked for many years as a senior editor and also at simon & schuster as well. i have been around the block. a bit of a veteran in august. but we have learned so many things in this conference so far. such a delight in such a pleasure to have heard the wonderful keynote speech. the report from the frontline with so many countries like russia and south africa, to learn that the first encounter between europe and the new world, but between the conquistadors and into was over a book. with thomas jefferson and the wondrous discussion register. such a vibrant discu
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 11:00pm EST
political campaign. but it talks about health care, education, the policy of capital punishment, which regardless of your philosophy isn't working. getting into responsible criminal-justice issues and rehabilitation, that sort of thing. i even recommended going on the metric system which is certainly something else and you said i'm running for vice president with governor gary johnson. it's amazing because she from a totally different perspective has come out to pretty much the same analysis that i have on all these important issues like education. today the talk you were wearing, and i like it by the way, deutsch shows how much to spend, where to go, what to buy. like all other consumer goods that is how we get reasonable bids for reasonable prices that education is completely different than that. it is funded from the top up so the federal government thinks of this money keeps a bunch of it and gives it to the state and keep a bunch of it for their administrative costs and give it to the school districts, give it to the schools, the use a lot of administrative costs and then i
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 3:00pm EST
wife more than anyone. every bit as intelligent as her husband, lizzie was much better educated having attended both elementary and boarding schools and having herself worked as a teacher for many years. there seemed nothing this exceedingly capable woman couldn't do from layingly knoll yum to explaining mathematics. following the birth of their fourth child, she even helped handle affairs at the mill while skinner was away in england, and later she helped to run the mill's boarding house. she was intimately involved in her husband's business. but what set her apart was the fact that she was the wife of a rich manufacturer. there was no economic reason for her to be absorbing these responsibilities. she simply took them on, utilizing her amazing genius for organization and development. more than a wife to skinner, lizzie was a partner. skinner's first wife had died young, but lizzie had raised his children as her own and given birth to eight more as well. of these ten children, seven were still living, and adding to skinner's sense of accomplishment, all were thriving. nelly and nina,
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 4:30pm EST
where my firstborn started his education, the school is an american rainbow. african, polish, mexican, croatian, you name it, it's there all gathered at the christmas pageant. standing on the rickety stage gleefully parading about in a santa hats. talking to his friend, the chinese grow with the white mom and pakistan. i am cooling in the year of our newborn baby when the signal comes in the class starts in on their signs on. a little wobbly and first, what they catch the swing soon enough, and when they hit the course i cannot help myself. i start to sing along. i love this melody. i love this side of my sweet kid among all these other sweet kids. hammer and bring-your are i felt on my first fight in a redwood forest, the adrenaline pumping through my veins . my sons will make their own memories. one day they will realize just what it means that this land is their land and that they share it with 310 million others. it when my baby will come crying in the middle of the nine would walk up and down the hallway singing this song. a long time since i last saying is, maybe fifth grade, bu
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 7:45am EST
the catholic school and the north side of chicago where my firstborn started his education. the school is an american rainbow, african, polish, mexican, croatian, indian, you name it it's there. they're all gathered at the christmas pageant, the three-year-olds are standing on the rickety stage gleefully parading about in the santa hats. my son is talking to his friend lisa, the chinese girl with a white mom and the pakistani and. i am cooing in the air of our newborn baby when the signal comes and the class starts in on their assigned some. it's a little wobbly at first but they catch the swing soon enough, and when they hit the chorus i can't help myself. i start to sing along. i love this melody. i love the sight of my sweet kid among all these other sweet kids. i'm remembering the sheer all i felt him at first sight in a redwood forest, the adrenaline pumping through my veins when inhaled my first taxi on the new york island. my sons will make their own memories on this blessed patch of earth. one day, they will realize just what it means that this land is their land, and th
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 4:30pm EST
compassion card. this is to help children. you are against children? you don't like education? so you go on the moral defensive. so it's not enough to say free markets work. if people feel free markets are somehow a moral, that is sort of a semi-corrupt bargain but they give us material things so we put up with this, it will wither away. it will die. we are trying to say no, free markets don't deliver goods. they deliver good because it's based on morality, amoral optimism about the future. you don't make an investment if you think is that a future. you don't take a risk if you have an environment of pessimism. you take the risk and think i may lose everything, but it may work so i'll try it. that's why you get that optimism and free markets. >> and "freedom manifesto" there is a list of federal taxes in here. accounts receivable tax cut building permit tax, corporate income tax, dog license tax, federal income tax, phishing attacks, iris don't take him a local income tax, luxury taxes for a marriage license tax, payroll, real estate tax and i'm kind of editing as they go here come th
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 9:00pm EST
all or nothing guy, and kennedy gets the picture. it's part of the education with kennedy. what i like about kennedy is he was raw and green, but he learned on the ground. he was bullied at the vienna summit, a rough summer with berlin, but he learned, and by the time of the cuban missile crisis in 1962, he's a great president. listen to the tapes of the missile crisis, and i have for a book i wrote on bobby kennedy, after the tapes, kennedy sounds great. president kennedy, particularly on the last day, the 13th day everybody's getting nervous, you hear voices getting squeaky, president kennedy is cool understanding we need a deal, russians, secretly, but have to make a deal with them, and thank god there was a couple years to learn on the job, and because he did in the end handle the crisis well. some of the education came from president eisenhower. anybody else? thank you very much. [applause] >>> for more information visit the author's website at evanthomasbooks.com. >> booktv on location at the u.s. naval academy in annapolis, maryland interviews professors who a also authors.
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 3:00pm EST
were blaming, then, the jailer for not contributing to their education. whereupon the jailer and wife made several racist comments, you know, about why would you want to try to educate these monkeys anyway? this became part of the tension, but the little girls #w-r put into a different category, and then there was, later on, a very big battle over who should be their proper -- who should be in charge of their lives basically, and were removed from the household of the jailer, and then then lived with an abolitionist close to the african himself. >> [inaudible] >> the question was did they go back to sierra leone? yes, they did. all three little girls remained with the mission for many years, and, right there, she actually came back to the united states and became, i do believe, the first black female graduate of overland college. then went back to sierra leone as a missionary herself. most found their families and did what they wanted to do when they got back. they wanted to go back to their lives. there's a continue -- a tragic point for sinke when searching for his wife and chi
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 2:45pm EST
young minds of education programs. were helping to build the free institutions of the middle east with women's fellowship since it will help wounded warriors and other veterans and their families through military service initiative. today is the president said this about economic freedom, which is the surest route to growth. as president bush wrote in his forward to 4% solution, free-market capitalism offers the most efficient and just way to order an economy. such a system allows individuals to decide the course of their alliance. this book does not exist in a vacuum. side of the 4% growth product had eight in nitish lays. the product began at smu in the spring of 2011. i know many of you were there. the hard top economists and started a website. we held a second conference on tax policy in may in new york and we have an event scheduled in september in chicago that will feature governor mitch daniels. like the project as a whole, this book seeks americans as our economic problems as a way to advance opportunity and prosperity. we are currently growing at 2%. that's not good enough. th
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 10:45pm EST
prior books which i rely on as complete. so i think they do a great service to educating the public and writers and a free but he also not the court. >> i share the concern about the future of the records that will be available from the justices and their papers. i asked once about what the justices are doing with their e-mail. is there any regime for saving e-mail and i was told no there isn't much of a role. they still -- most of the communications on paper, but there is no rule about the e-mail and the justice peepers are not governed, are not viewed as public documents in the same way the presidential papers are. .. >> you know, the brother and was published in 1979. there wasn't really a behind-the-scenes book about the supreme court, [inaudible] between 1979 and 2010. when i wrote my other book. i think there is some generational change that has gone on record. i think that the justices were on the court, they really were of a different generation where the press was not a major factor in their thinking. you now have several justices in their 50s who grew up in a different env
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 8:15pm EST
could he and education, sort of guide to how we would put recruitment strategies or how to use them as a tool in other fields? >> i think you're absolutely right in that is why had done this thing up diving. i've been involved with politics since i was 16 and i go juan iranian television and they go on saudi television discussing world affairs. i also do american television on a radio station talking about world affairs. why? these things are all related. mass behavior among parts having relationship to mass behavior among human beings doesn't make that massive behavior predictable because the mass of behavior builds behavior considerably. it builds on repulsion but in recognizing the commonalities lies a hint of the solution and if you read my first book the lucifer principle, the forces of history, you will see ideas like this applied in ways that relate directly to geopolitics and to economics and if you read my second book global brain, the office from the secretary of defense thought that book was so relevant to these kinds of things that office through a seminar based on the book
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 9:45am EST
] equipment of an education. schooling, anything at all, anything outside the koran is -- [inaudible] it is very easy to mobilize the youth who sit at the feet of the moon law at the schools and to take orders, who believe that [inaudible]. of the cleric in charge. the politics of nigeria became complicated, simply because of something the british did. they were not satisfied. there had to be dissension, division in the sense of the political power in the country. so when the british left, before the left they created -- [inaudible] and naturally they wanted closest to their viable or already practicing a kind of structure, which is close to what the british practice at the time until later in the year. and so they not only falsified the elections that followed, preceded independence. they falsified even consensus. now, if you check the annals of home office, so-called home office, which is where the colonies are ministered, look for the book of harold smith was one of the civil service in nigeria at the time. he was in the white house and he got into trouble because he not will -- he di
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 3:30pm EST
scandinavian and educated at a liberal arts college in the university -- he said to me, the low-scaled american worker is the most overpaid worker in the world. [laughter] he said it's sad, but it's true. the american-based ceo of the one of the world's largest fund managers told me about a conversation that handed in his investment committee. quite often people would tell me things like they didn't say it, but their friends said snit my kids do that also sometimes. so he said this is someone else on the investigating committee said. his point was that the transformation of the world economy lifts four people in china and india out of poverty and into the middle class, and meanwhile one american drops out of the middle class, that's not such a bad trade, right? like four to one. i spoke to a cfo of a u.s. technology company, and this was like a really, a person who was really sort of charming and lovely life story. he was taiwanese-born, his parents were immigrants, and his parents told him and his brother when they immigrated that they were temporarily poor. i love that, you know, ima
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 11:00am EST
useful just like a newborn is limited in skill, without an education or supporting the paradigm for a i, artificial intelligence, to educate them. >> host: can you elaborate on what the neocortex is as opposed to the brain? >> guest: the old brain and the new brain. the new brain is the neocortex. only mammals have the neocortex. these early mammals emerged over 1 hundred million years ago, the neocortex is the size of a postage stamp and is basically the outer layer, neocortex means new rind, of the brain and capable of thinking in a hierarchical fashion. >> host: that is the part of the brain you are focusing on. >> caller: -- >> guest: it has complexity 2. twenty-nine and change quickly they were able to adapt. that was not so much an advantage because the environment did not change quickly. it is the normal process of biological evolution, changing behavior over thousands of generations. it is good enough for non medallion species until the cretaceous extinction event sixty-five million years ago. we see geological evidence of it everywhere in the world, something dramatic happened
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 4:15pm EST
of women, marriage has taken different paths in this country. for the college-educated we have a new model of marriage i call the see-saw marriage. this example is the obamas. they have a classic see-saw marriage where the men and women take turns being the family's main provider over the course of the marriage and this has led to a happy stable marriages, very low divorce rate among the college-educated, very long-lasting marriages, low likelihood of raising children alone. michele obama was a health care executive making a lot of money and barack obama was in law school doing public service and they have switched places where he is the main guy and she is the supporter and this is a pretty common pattern of marriage among the college-educated and it has proved to be a stable, good model where as for everybody else in america for the 70% of americans who don't have a college degree marriage is disappearing. people are not getting married. if they are getting married they have high divorce rate and rates of single motherhood are astronomical. it is largely because women are doing eve
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 1:05am EST
, stewards a scholarship and education education, disseminate ears of scientific discovery, champions of literature. however one defines knowledge today but could not have the merged and is not worth sustaining without the distribution of books and journals and other professional content. it goes without saying that wherever there is publishing there is copyright. senator keating was called at the jugular of the industry. quote when maria said that earlier this year i thought i have to attribute that to her and i would not do otherwise. [laughter] but it seemed to sum up what i have heard since i walked into this position three years ago. publishers some care more about making books and making money but there has to be returned. one of the big ceos said i gamble with other people's money. that is true of the consumer sector where you don't know what will work and rabat but it doesn't fly to the educational sector. everybody in the industry cares about copyright but there is enormous differences in between what goes on in the cage wealth market. that is very different where sales are m
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:00am EST
will be on nationwide tv. describe the whole sense in education program. >> was that experience like? >> well, it is such an emotional , thrilling to more rewarding experience, both for my wife and i to teach these young men and some of them older, people who have committed heinous crimes, murder, what have you. they see the error of their ways and turn things around. that education process as well as the minister program is extremely important. a major name of one sort. warren buffett was there a few years ago because his sister, as a matter of fact, is a major supporter of hudson, the nonprofit organization. the year to this graduation ceremony and it's just incredible. opening and closing prayers. the old bible or what have you. they always have a valedictorian get up representing the graduates. usually maybe 20, 30 students who are graduating in ssc it's our best agree. and the valedictorian gets up and says, you know, i started off my parents own mother, the great hopes for me. then i got in the wrong crowd. i got into drugs are what have you. and then he says, and then i killed
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 5:00pm EST
beautiful memoir last year how do we create educational opportunities for the families that will not take care of them who have been told you were broke and? were they will reject them because they are gay or lesbian? merisel lost college feels like another planet it. we read about the game changing things that nonprofits are doing to create is goals there is a program here and is connected to the drop in center for disconnected youth that school was started with the notion there are young people who feel marginalized. can you get them to come and? at the filenet -- house we run ever only those who have spent expelled they did not cite fan the best and brightest these are schools for kids who are the best and brightest but rejected from the mainstream system. there is not a lot of those. we know of just a handful and we think more of that would create opportunity if you look at the labor statistics kids with the high-school diploma are much more likely to find work than those new to not. getting kid to cross that bridge is for those that work with young people. those who are homeless
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 6:30am EST
education, transportation especially to someplace where they could live undisturbed as free people. and it's interesting, when this bit of information came out in the smithsonian magazine an excerpt from the book, a number of people said to me that they had never heard of it. and i said i never heard of it either until i stumbled across this in philadelphia. and a couple people have thought about this. the parlor game when you hope your book is being made into a movie, who do want to start in it, people began to say i wonder whom he could free? people thought of john and priscilla hemings. they said well, maybe he could have freed some of his farmers, and then someone said, the faucets. he could've freed joe. you was a blacksmith. and ed was his cook and had a whole bunch of children. and it turned out any auction of jefferson's estate after the war, and after his death, joseph was in 13. jefferson left the rest of the family in slavery, and they're scattered to different masters. and joseph worked for 10 years in this forge trying to earn the money to buy back his own wife and all of his ch
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 10:00pm EST
the women he called my darling. and was much better educated and having herself worked as a teacher for many years. there was nothing this woman could not do too late linoleum or explain mathematics. following the birth of their fourth child she would handle the affairs at the milk while skinner was in england and ran the boarding house. and was intimately involved in her husband's business but she was the wife of a rich manufacturer. there is no economic reason for her to absorber these responsibilities. she took them on. but lizzy was a partner for the first wife died young. but she had raised the children as her own and given birth to age more and of the 10 children seveners still living and all were thriving. and with smart educated young women. but studying french with nine other than george to would be the prime minister of france. going one step further and nina went to college was up in poughkeepsie new york. the oldest, will, 17 was about to close out high-school at the prestigious seminary in east hampton and massachusetts. graduation was a few weeks away if he could make
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 6:00pm EST
to exposes them to a european education into the world of international affairs in the world of diplomacy. and they went to sea with benjamin franklin and benjamin franklin's lavish chÂteau outside paris at the time and john quincy adams went to a french school with benjamin franklin's grandson. within several, he was speaking french folly. he was a gifted child. by the time he was 15 he could speak four languages fought late, had rd studied latin and greek. he was so gifted in foreign languages or when the family friend, francis daniel was appointed ambassador, minister to russia, our first minister to russia, he couldn't speak french at the time french was not the language of international diplomacy. there's always the language spoken in the russian court. francis couldn't speak french. young john quincy could and asked john could he take john quincy adams within two st. petersburg as secretary of litigation is 16 years of age. john quincy adams goes up two st. petersburg and spends the europe they are. in the wintertime, it was too cold to really venture out. so john quincy
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 5:00pm EST
mother and father through months of brokenness, sacrificing her education. the people of richmond hill georgia and the surroundisurroundi ng areas welcomes matthew home with tears, flags and staff salute. the streets were lined for 17 miles from the airport to the church. local choirs joined to sing it has memorial service at the methodist church that helped raise him. knowing matthew had been an eagle scout, a local boy scout troop honored him by collecting pens and papers and sending them to mattheus unit map these unit in afghanistan. a dear friend who was involved in the media had a fission and the project began. he dedicated much time and energy to produce a short film on memorial day 2010. since then with the help of so many volunteers, and i can't name them all, that project has sent over seven tons of school supplies to our soldiers and marines in humanitarian efforts in afghanistan. matthews small town of richmond hill and outlying city of savannah and their great army bases of ft. stewart and hunter army airfield and the savannah aircard have helped me heal by supporting the
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 6:00pm EST
things that hadn't been easy to do before. c-span: how much education did your father have? >> guest: he never went to college. he went to high school in pasadena. his father had found someone to manage the ranch, eventually, and the family had moved to pasadena. c-span: pasadena--what state? >> guest: california. c-span: california. >> guest: and my father went through high school in pasadena and he had wanted to go to stanford, and it was at the time of world war i, and two things happened. my father was drafted briefly before the end of world war i, although he never saw military action because it ended. and his father died. and my father was sent out to the ranch to try to keep the lid on things... c-span: how much education... >> guest: ... while the estate was settled. c-span: i'm sorry. how much education did your mother have? >> guest: my mother had a degree from the university of arizona, and she had taught school, grade school, i think, for a while in el paso. c-span: so when did you--given that atmosphere at that ranch and all the newspapers and magazines coming out, when
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 6:00pm EST
james gibbons of baltimore. he was educated at yale university and law school and immediately entered the navy where he received the purple heart for his service in the pacific theater. the immediacy of his experience has made him a man that was dedicated to making every feasible effort to achieve peace. after he was discharged at the end of the war key worked at newsweek magazine, and in that job came into contact with joseph kennedy sr., who asked him to manage the merchandise in chicago. during the chicago years, he married the daughter eunice in 1953 and chaired the chicago school board in the catholic interracial council as a supporter of desegregation of the city schools. shriver's prominence in the commercial and social life of the state soon lead to interest on the part of the political leaders to nominate him for governor of illinois. but by then, his brother-in-law, john kennedy, was running for president. shriver served us kennedy's chair for illinois and also head of the campaign civil rights division. in that capacity, leading a campaign, he convinced kennedy to telephone
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 1:00pm EST
, a budget plan that invested in our people, invested in the infrastructure, invested in education, and at the same time said we can find cuts in other areas and we can raise taxes on those who are doing very well. and what happened with that fair and balanced approach? what happened was the greatest prosperity in modern history. 23 million jobs, no more deficits, we got to a balanced budget and i remember saying to my husband my goodness, what's going to happen? there won't be any more u.s. government bonds because we're going to be out of the debt situation. we saw -- we saw it on the horizon when george w. bush became president, he decided to go back, backwards on rates across the board from the wealthiest to the middle to the poor, and he put two wars on a credit card and we are where we are where we are. and to add to this history, we all know that we're coming out of the worst recession since the great depression. it has been difficult, led by, unfortunately, some unscrupulous people on wall street who created a nightmare in the housing market. i remember saying to treasury s
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 12:30pm EST
. someone, a woman who wanted to get a college education in the 1920s was in general thought to be pursuing that for her own personal betterment, and not for the purpose of having a career. was to become a better life, a better homemaker, a better mother in the future. that was the object of post secondary education, primarily. women did go into the teaching profession, and so carson certainly could've been a teacher. she could've taught biology, or writing eventually for that matter. that would've been a career avenue that would've been open to a. science was also more open to women than other disciplines were. the marine biological laboratory at, was a place where a lot of prominent women scientists study. one of carson's predecessors was another person who went on to actually become a writer, gertrude stein spent a couple of summers studying marine biology, which i find kind of interesting. but yes, carson's prospects would've a very circumscribed by the fact that she was a woman. i was talking order today with someone about her role and whether there was something that was gend
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 3:00pm EST
to annapolis which was getting a good education but preparing himself for a life to be a doctor like his two parents had been. to a chapter which is one of my favorites called "plato and socrates" which describes the relationship between he and paul in its saw, it enabled him, i think, to navigate the political rivers that he would have to cross. and he learned some techniques of breaking down, to be more an lettic and to think critically about issues. it's a remarkable relationship between the two men. and it will, ultimately, cause zumwalt some problems with his boss, admiral tom moore. because tom moore would soon come to resent the closeness that bud zumwalt had with paul. because oftentimes with respect to vietnam policy, bud was following out about policy before admiral moore would know antibiotic. and this eventually -- about it. and this eventually led moore to come up with this plan. no one had ever heard of any admiral who went off to vietnam at that time. it was sort of like the death knell for admirals. and the navy itself was in the bath water at that time except, o
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 7:15am EST
develop a strong interest in paul jennings when i was director of education at james madison's month peelier in virginia. i was familiar with jennings' memoir considered by the white house historical association to be the first memoir of life in the white house. it was titled "a colored man's rem innocences of james madison," and as the title implies, it's really more about the so-called great man than it was about the author himself. my interest was in paul jennings. i set out to discover elements of his own biography to uncover the circumstances behind the original publication of the memoir in 1865 and to find an interview living direct descendents. a slave in the white house, paul jennings and the madisons is the story of paul jennings' unique journey from slavery to freedom. it played out in the highest circles of ideas and power. the white house, james madison's study. it's the story of paul jennings' complicated relationship with the father of the constitution, james madison. jennings was the constant servant in james madison's study, and as madison would discuss political subj
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 9:00am EST
. this is the protest the supreme court decision in the brown v. board of education decision 1954. strom thurmond is a recordholder to this day of the longest one man filibuster. and again his work pashtun and the guinness book of world records, 24 hours and 18 minutes he spoke against the 1957 civil rights bill. we remember strom thurmond today as one of the last of the jim crow demagogues. and he was. he was that. he was one of the last jim crow demagogue. what we forget about thurmond is that he was also one of the first of the sun belt conservatives. what do i mean by that? what's a sun belt conservative? the sun belt, it's one of the big stories, one of the major stories in the history of 20th century american politics. and that is the flow of jobs, of industry, of resources and population from the states of the northeast and the midwest to the south and the southwest in the post-world war ii period. the southern states were recruiting industries. they were passing right-to-work laws. they were receiving lots of funding from the federal government to build military installations at
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 8:15pm EST
roman invasion, and bill hooks, a famous writer, and also -- advocating for compulsory education for girls in pakistan who was tried and murdered. i'd like to make that comment. my condolences to your parents, and i love that. i love how you talked about the -- do not have to be -- more than capable of being trained to be able to defend themselves. and, yeah, so peace and love. >> host: matthew. >> guest: i appreciate that. i should also tell you that so many, matthew, of the people that got -- when we started writing "heros for my son" and i went on facebook or twitter and said please send me other heros and so many people have send me heroes. in fact one of the last heros in the book is a woman named will ma rude dolph, and i didn't know who she was. she was young girl who had polio, and the doctors said she would never be able to walk, ever, and her mom used to drive back and forth, take a bus for hours and hours trying to get her to doctors appointments, and they said, she'll never walk. final russian when she was a little girl, take herbarieses off, and she starts running, and s
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 9:15am EST
educated in the united states and he said i am ready to surrender. lieutenant edmonds said to him take me to the commander of the fort and that is exactly what he did. with his tongue begun in his side the fabulous four went through the battery, down an elevator, went through an amphitheater that looked like a football field and they went into the depths of the guns of navarrone type situation. and the commanding officer's office and he decided to break through the door and the commanding officer gave him -- what you want? we would like you to surrender the 4 ridge. the commanding officer's -- he was incredulous. you are only four men. he picked up the telephone and said you are my prisoner. at that point, robert edmond had one of the greatest bluffs of world war ii, pull out a hand grenade and put it between his legs and said you are going to surrender. at that point, eight hundred men surrendered after rebroadcast that over the loudspeaker. incredible story of world war ii that is completely documented in the national archives. for his efforts robert englund received the bronze star. co
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 9:00am EST
list book that got a second wind and this was in the education of general david petraeus by paula broadwell. any comments on those books? >> it is funny refer to that book as a poorly amid this title about a second wind because after general david petraeus administration, that is exactly why her book got the second wind and why the paperback publication was pushed up. what it has done a little bit though is take away from the larger aspect of these books. when scandal rears its head, one focus is too much on that instead of the substance of the book. one thing worth pointing out especially in relation to the mark cohen and mark cohen was a pseudonym for one of the navy seals who was involved in the mission to kill osama bin laden, the book's publisher which is penguin press, they announced with only weeks to spare, i felt they did a very brilliant job of marketing that book. it didn't help or perhaps didn't hurt depending on who you ask that mark owens's real name was dutifully revealed by the media which than cost its own fire storm and the like but the upshot is many of these bo
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 10:00am EST
education has a hurting on, i could read the writing on the wall. kodachrome gave us a nice bright colors command makes you think the world of sunny day. i've got a nikon camera. i love to take photographs. so mama, don't take my kodachrome away. [laughter] >> i'm glad you mentioned it. my essay in the book really tells the back story of the manbo families, by the open with paul simon's kodachrome. i open with that very lyric. because what i say is kodachrome does make you think all the world is a sunny day. but what if the story really isn't so sunny and that's the central problem in the central challenge and the sensual delight of these color photographs. adiabatic adding a mac >> is a very preset of observation. so billy was four when he left camp. he doesn't remember any of this. he had very fleeting memories. his family as was common among japanese american families, his parents never taught about this episode at all within. so he has no memories of this. he has no evidence dearness. he remembers going around looking for rocks with his grandmother. he remembers little things l
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 7:00pm EST
more about that? i know you have gained a lot of financial education since he started as the t.a.r.p. general. could you explain how this will work? >> yes, glass-steagall was the law that separated investment banks and commercial banks. so it meant that basically a big like citibank or jpmorgan chase could not also do investment banking activities. also in other areas like insurance. that bill really got dismantled by a series of regulatory deficiencies by the feds leading up to the end of the clinton administration for the last messages were basically torn apart by legislation. the way president obama is referring to it, and he is accurate, some of the biggest classes didn't happen from commercial banks. but also investment banks. it was pure investment banking or an insurance company like aig. this is a popular thing that is done by those on wall street that want to keep the status quo, too big to fail, they want to keep it going. those of them that advocate the law, it's not necessary. i think you look at a bank like citigroup, which clearly suffered enormous losses. the only rea
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 12:00pm EST
the anti-war movement end the war? i feel strongly anti-war education in congress and on the ground forced polk to bring the war to a close even though he wanted more territory. it did limit the territorial acquisition from this war. i believe that had polk been allowed to continue fighting, mexico would have been forced to give up more land than it did. it definitely mobilized the public in support of bringing an american war to a close for the first time. it is important to acknowledge antiwar movements existed in the past, that they can work, they can have real effect and limit the loss of life. the anti-war movement in the mexico war did all these things. thank you very much. [applause] [inaudible] >> sure. all right. so. this is the area that mexico initially was trying to give up which is california going directly -- san francisco bay as well. this is what the united states end -- this is what is down here. basically wants to come down here and come here, what we truly love and talking about. >> what was steven's position on the war. >> saved the war. he was the democrats, he
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 1:00pm EST
, yes. quite educated people make that mistake. i remember morgan kondraki on television. when the texas homosexual sodomy case came up, he said the only issue was whether you wanted to see homosexuals in jail. that's not the issue at the case at all, who should make the law; the legislature or the court? when there is no law to begin with until somebody acts? >> host: are there thing thingst the, major things that the constitution doesn't protect against? is there, are there a lot of bad things that can happen which the constitution doesn't address? >> guest: well, no. i can't think of any bad things that are going to happen. the laws may be passed that i don't like, but i can't classify that automatically as a bad thing. i remember a student asking me did the constitution protect marriage. well, it doesn't really. they didn't think anybody was insane enough to get rid of marriage. and nobody is. but the student said he couldn't put up with any theory that didn't protect marriage. now, that's a hypothetical about a horrible world which is never going to come to pass, but those hyp
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 1:30pm EST
some molecular biology for a master's, but it's clear that he is scientific education did not go in vain. when i got my copy i went to the chapter that i would be able to judge vest on the energy environment or chapter 5 conservation and clean energy chaos. i happen to love the liberation myself, so i got a freebie in that title and i was pleased to see the tape on the creasy aspects of the environmental policy favored by progressives from those that don't work to ruechel or heads that his attitude and don't get you clean. and they pointed out some points about water conservation where if you were worried about water conservation you wouldn't be looking at the shower heads and toilets because most of the water that is used as industrial for energy use and irrigation and so forth and you have to get all the way down to the 1% level when you talk about the consumer use of water that he would be trying to knock that down by a percentage or so by going to the smaller toilets and showers. so i am hoping that one of the things that we also discuss is one of my pet peeves which is the will
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 7:00pm EST
the education associations as sz -- i would be at sea for three weeks away from telephone internet and physical libraries yet i was in the middle of the research project on benjamin franklin the required me to read material and friend so i decided to use my time at sea to read a novel in that language. the book i chose is a small paperback edition of jules byrnes of around the world in 80 days first published in the newspaper serial in 1872. when i wasn't on watch or otherwise busy on on the ship i slowly made my way to the book. by french was good enough to my surprise but i actually enjoyed the story and as a historian i appreciated its period details especially the nature of the protagonists they englishman racing around the world. and has remarked offhandedly travel services at could take a person round the globe in a period of 80 days. prove that he challenged him and he is off. that 80 day measure was only conceivable by the late 19th century and the age of sales getting sails getting around the world have taken months or even years. the speed of my sailing ship would have --
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 7:30am EST
connection was not to convert them, but to educate them. and to improve their lives and tangible ways because that's what they responded to positively. once he had the inside, he had what became the greatest university of her release. >> isn't still open? >> it is. it weathered many tech theories, but it remains open and stay that way. >> who owns it, who rents it? >> it is still run by a very impressive faculty of professors and administrators who are middle easterners and american. daniel liss and peter gorman who is a psychologist by training and shared with the important departments at the university of chicago before he took the shot of a couple years ago. >> is it coincidental uses direct consignment was that on purpose? >> he has a personal passion for the school because of his family connections. >> i can come in the american university, or who runs the? >> faculty air missile easterners. the vast majority of students. >> is it associated with religion, another school? >> is deliberately secular nonsectarian. >> what does it cost to go their four-year? >> i have no idea. >> what would
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 10:00am EST
, walled off from the outside world employing tens of thousands of less educated workers. a wonderful recipe for short-run productivity, a wonderful recipe for paying worker $5 a day. it was factories like this that made detroit quite possibly the most productive place on the planet in the '50s, but these were not a recipe for long-run urban regeneration because they don't need the city, they don't give to the city. they're a world unto themselves. when conditions change, and they always change, you just move the factories to places where it's cheaper. you have nothing left. and so as transportation costs declined, we moved these factories to lower cost locale, we moved them to the suburbs, we moved them to the right-to-work states and across the country. now, detroit still has not recovered from deindustrialization. in part, detroit had the worst of all possible worlds, it had a single large industry, a few dominant firms. those firms crowded out all local entrepreneurship, and the city has had a significant degree of problems ever since. they have 25% -- they've lost 25% of their po
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 1:00am EST
administration running education programs for after being chancellor the university of colorado boulder people said was the first woman to be a the stage at a research university. i had a fight with ronald reagan even though i was a commissioner one of my latino women was the only other minority we would dissent when they would try to do something that was terrible. we had a big fight with him but i went to all of those. >>host: but president carter appointed you? >> yes. then there is a new department of education and i went back to teaching and that i was appointed. >>host: when did the clear it would be a permanent agency? >>guest: after the first year. the commission was set of sitting down to say we will just served, they did some hearings. the major power the commission has, when it does what it is supposed to do, it will listen to people and civil rights problems that they could not get anyone to pay attention. the federal government. nobody would pay attention. the first year they would go out and listen to the people. they have the power to subpoena any one. eisenhower said i w
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 9:45pm EST
to which the library is a model of educating young people is really remarkable and a lot of that goes to the energy that drive it to be candid the fundraising ability that john brings to this. john, thank you for your work and thank you for the introduction. [applause] i hope all of you will join calista and me in keeping mrs. rage anyone your prayers. she's a remarkable woman who spent a lifetime working for this country. we cherish role while she continues to play a role here in the library. i couldn't come here without mentioning nancy for a minute. governor, it's great to be back with you. we did a lot of things over the years. from you being mayor in san diego, to u.s. senator and leader in a variety of ways. i look to them as great people who represent a willingness to serve their state and country. an important way, and i want to say it's a family engagement out there. thank you both for serving the country. it makes a difference. it's great to be back here. [applause] i didn't know you would be with us. we're thrilled to have you here tonight. we have launched what we cal
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 11:00pm EST
won for specific specific education. the topic i will be discussing today is not the topic -- such is the point of clarification. that is black history month are women's history month or presidents' day. we are we are going to talk about my new book, "affairs of the state" and what i was trying to get at with the book was that rather than just tell stories about presidential history, the book is not just about the whodunit, but who did it and who didn't do it or with whom. i have tried to find a new lens and a new way of setting presidential characters. for example 12 years ago i read a book on the first lady and i thought it would be important to understand the presidents from a different angle. that is why not study the person that knew them the best? for example what possibly could i as an historian could should be to the body of knowledge on lincoln or george washington? pretty much everything that could be written about linking -- lincoln or washington probably has been written. the rate historians whose figures point to pouring through the letters and the evidence of a book on i
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 12:00pm EST
and that kids in poverty don't have the access to success, good education, few traditionally-fit to learn -- nutritionally-fit to learn, materially ready to learn. and that's the lie, or that's the incompleteness that we have to address. that when kids stand up in certain neighborhoods and kids stand up in more affluent neighborhoods and they say those words, liberty and justice for all, when they pledge allegiance to our flag, that that phrase, "liberty and justice for all," should be a command, should be a compelling aspiration, and there should be a conscious conviction amongst us to make that real. but right now we are lacking that sense of urgency, and we can't sit around and wait for elected leaders to do it. when i think about great movements in america, i don't really think they were led by elected officials. elected officials were often responding to the pressure or responding to the leadership on the ground, and that's really what we should be doing. when we're thub voting, conversations, debates, how can we have an entire presidential debate, and it seems that the word "p
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